SMOKE

X LEBENSON GALLERY 

PARIS

XCHNGE

Two influential european galleries offer XCHNGE – PARIS XCHNGE LONDON – Lebenson Gallery and GALLERY46 – present ‘SMOKE’ & ‘STRENGTH’.

Only the smoke can elevate us among a pile of insignificant images, a smoke which covers, veils, reflects. The smoke puts everything into distance which is the only luxury in art. This smoke is literally relevant in the work of ROMAIN RIVIÉRE where the smoke is getting between our vision and the objects, “smoking” all the limits of narration. But by its absence, the smoke becomes an element of the invisible, a-non image, an essential disturbance to the common reading.

Getting an invisible smoke in art is the art of disturbance, which happens to be at the centre of the dyslexia of reality by PHILIPPE SOUSSAN with his series of chairs, or the essential disruptive alterity in the case of OBVIOUS where the algorithm give us to see a visage, a presence unseen before. ARNIE gets into the inner blue vision of a metal soul, giving a soul to the digital flux. YUVAL SHAUL, leans us to the abysses with his porcelain shark submarine and antler boats from Pearl Harbour.

Smoking, if only I could again, in a fucking lonely cinema in St Germain!

The importance of a curatorial exchange to bring together and unite peoples & cultures has perpetually been the role of artists and galleries, not just in times of turmoil and right wing politik – the necessity to engage, embrace and bond sensibility and action is a vital and intrinsic purpose.

The XCHNGE of perspectives and ideas that come from artists and galleries in their respective climate and culture gives understanding of differences in nuance and perspectives the artist and curators attain without thought and allows the audience to understand an insight if the differences can be detected or seen.

Artists

ARNIE

DOPPELDENK

MYONG HO LEE

HEIDI MORIOT

LUCAS PRICE

OBVIOUS

ROMAIN RIVIÉRE

DERRICK SANTINI

YUVAL SHAUL

LEE SOL
PHILIPPE SOUSSAN

THINK

Exhibiting

Obvious

“La Duchess de Belamy”

Impression sur toile

Print on canvas

70 x 70 cm Unique Signed

'Portrait of Edmond Belamy’ from art collective Obvious was only expected to sell for $7,000 to $10,000.

A painting created by artificial intelligence sold for $432,000 at the Christie's Prints and Multiples art auction in New York. 

 

The piece, called "Portrait of Edmond Belamy," is the first artwork made entirely by AI to go up for sale at a major art auction. It was expected to fetch between $7,000 and $10,000, making the $432,000 haul quite the shocker.

 

The painting was the work of a type of algorithm known as Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) that was devised by a Paris-based art collective called Obvious. The group fed the algorithm a data set of about 15,000 portraits painted between the 14th and 20th centuries. A Generator portion of the algorithm used its understanding of those many works of art to start creating its own images.

Another part of the system, the Discriminator, was tasked with determining the difference between the human-made art and the art being produced by the Generator. This process continued until the Discriminator could no longer tell the works apart, at which point the art collective decided the work was good enough to sell.

The "Portrait of Edmond Belamy" was one of 11 in a series of portraits of non-existent people created by the AI. Obvious Art is selling the other portraits for 10,000 euros a pop on its website, though the group may start rethinking that price point after the auction.'